Expert at the Card Table DVD set Expand
Expert at the Card Table DVD set
Expert at the Card Table DVD set Expert at the Card Table DVD set Expert at the Card Table DVD set

Expert at the Card Table DVD set

4 Review(s)
Houdini's Magic Shop Houdini's Magic Shop

05-0395

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Este conjunto de DVD 10 enseña la técnica de la tarjeta completa. No sólo se le enseñará las técnicas, pero también está dando un pedazo de historia. Allan Ackerman es el mejor manipulater de la tarjeta por ahí!  

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$99.99

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Artificio, engaño y Subterfuge.
Protagonizada por Allan Ackerman

Además de una caracterización de la película introductoria de S.W. Erdnase "El prólogo", narrado por Ernest Borgnine

Basado en el clásico libro de 1902 de magia/juegos y trucos. Todo el contenido del libro es realizado e impartido por Ackerman en esta producción de disco DVD 10 múltiples, incluyendo muchos extras como entrevistas con Richard Hatch y Bart Whaley en el misterio de Erdnase. Así como una entrevista con Martin Gardner.


 

Ver una vista previa de vídeo de la Experto en la mesa de la tarjeta aquí.  

Grade 
03/07/2013

November Magic Circular

Reviewed by Matthew Field

Houdini's Magic Shops are ten stores located in Las Vegas owned by Geno Munari. Geno decided, after speaking with the well-known card expert Allan Ackerman, that he'd like to put out a set of DVDs to illustrate the moves described in the book. The project took longer than expected to complete (eight years!) and prior to the DVDs release Geno offered a Limited Edition which included everything detailed above for the price of the DVDs alone – an amazing value. While some of these items are not presently available, we'll take a look at the entire package.

First, a few introductory comments about the Erdnase book. Published in 1902, the volume has never been out of book, even though it is an admittedly difficult text. Dai Vernon was the most vocal admirer of the volume by the pseudonymous S.W. Erdnase, whose true identity has been the source of unending debate. Divided into sections on Card Table Artifice (a euphemism for 'cheating') and Legerdemain (or magic), the book is generally regarded as one of the first, and arguably the best, technical manuals on sleight-of-hand with cards.

The problem is that the writing is dense and, written as it was more than a century ago, difficult for some to absorb. Vernon was a proselytiser for the excellence of the material contained within, and his annotations were published by Mike Caveney's MagicWords as Revelations (newly issued, now with photographs and further text as Revelation by Mike). Few magicians are adept enough at the material in the book to accurately perform and clearly teach what is contained in the book, and the choice of Allan Ackerman is perfect. Allan stresses that the videos are meant to provide an accompaniment to the book, and that reading it is necessary. He goes through each sleight meticulously, and the lovely accompanying booklet, in addition to providing an overview, cross-indexes each DVD chapter with a page number in the book. This is simply superb. Allan performs in a studio, alone for the Artifice section and with a spectator for the Legerdemain material, and three cameras are used, including an overhead view.

The material begins with an introduction, meant to put the book into perspective. This is a fully staged playlet, produced with actors and narrated by the Academy Award-winning Ernest Borgnine. It's the story of the man many think was the real S.W. Erdnase, a hoodlum called Milton Franklin Andrews. We'll return to that name in a moment. This full-fledged production captures the mood and feel of turn-of-the-century gamblers in the western United States and is one of the finest magic-themed short films ever produced.

The Ackerman material occupies six of the disks in the set. DVDs seven through ten contain a telephone interview with Martin Gardner and an interview with Bart Whaley and a presentation by Richard Hatch. Gardner and Whaley, along with Jeff Busby, wrote The Man Who Was Erdnase, a book which put forth the theory that M.F. Andrews was the real name of the author. This has been disputed and other theories have emerged from Richard Hatch and others. The eleventh disc, a CD-ROM, contains Adobe Acrobat versions of the Erdnase book, in the edition which includes comments from Prof. Hoffmann (also a pseudonym, for Angelo Lewis), historic newspaper clippings describing Andrews and the bloody death he met, information about the various editions of Expert which have been published, and two articles written by Gardner, and a previously published book detailing the letters between Gardner and the illustrator of the Erdnase book, Marshall Smith..

As mentioned above, the Houdini company has issued some other books which will be briefly touched upon. The first of these is a small edition of the book itself. This is printed on very thin paper but everything is clear, including the many illustrations. It is a fine adjunct to the project; as Ackerman states, you definitely should read the book in addition to watching the DVDs.

Next is Marlo on Erdnase by Jon Racherbaumer. This relates to Erdnase only peripherally in most instances, unless you consider anything about cards to relate to Erdnase (which it sort of does). The material is a compendium of Marlo writings and Racherbaumer emendations from a variety of sources, many of these the so-called 'Private Manuscripts' Marlo issued which are difficult to find. There is much of value here for, as I am fond of saying, the serious student of card magic. Although riddled with typos, everything is clear. One might think that the idea of this volume was to get Marlo's name somehow into the Vernon/Erdnase duality, but Marlo does deal spcifically with several Erdnase items, notably the tricks "The Exclusive Coterie"and "A Mind Reading Trick" and at the conclusion of the book we find Marlo's often acerbic "Comments on Vernon's Revelations. All in all, this book is worthwhile.

I can no longer find on the Houdini website the following items, but I will at least tell you briefly about them. How Gamblers Win is a facsimile reproduction of a book on cheating by Gerritt M. Evans written in 1965 – that's more than 150 years ago. The book contains some interesting material from a historical perspective. It was reissued in an edited edition by the publishers Dick and Fitzgerald in 1868 authored by "A Retired Professional" and Bart Whaley says a copy of this bowdlerised edition is in The Magic Circle Library, but neither I nor executive Librarian Peter Lane were able to locate it.

That Gerritt M. Evans ... that couldn't be a pseudonym, could it? Bart Whaley provides some research in a small volume titles The Mysterious Gambler and The Man Who Was Erdnase: Loose Ends and Dead Ends to pretty conclusively prove that it was, with the real author name being Edward M. Grandin and the story is an interesting one. Also included in this volume is a bit of updating of The Man Who Was Erdnase, including those bits and pieces he'd like to track down and suggestions for those who might want to embark on that hunting expedition.

Because this review is of ten DVDs, a CD-ROM and four books it is much lengthier than what is usually included in this section of the magazine. But the project at hand is an enormous undertaking and, I believe, demands it.

I'll sum up as best I can. The DVD set of The Expert at the Card Table is a brilliant undertaking which, I believe, helps make a most important book much more accessible to contemporary students. The production, the packaging and the care that has been taken reveal the esteem and respect which Geno Munari and Allan Ackerman have for Erdnase and, indeed, for magic itself. The $130 (£60.70) works out to $21 (£10) per disc if you consider just the six discs of Ackerman material. With fully five additional DVDs and the CD-Rom plus the accompanying booklet, this is an unbelievable bargain. Those who ordered early and received the additional material were fortunate. Certainly the Marlo book is worth considering if you are serious about card magic.

My hat is off to Geno Munari and Allan Ackerman and the rest of the people who participated in this project. Bravo!

    Grade 
    03/07/2013

    November Magic Circular

    Reviewed by Matthew Field

    Houdini's Magic Shops are ten stores located in Las Vegas owned by Geno Munari. Geno decided, after speaking with the well-known card expert Allan Ackerman, that he'd like to put out a set of DVDs to illustrate the moves described in the book. The project took longer than expected to complete (eight years!) and prior to the DVDs release Geno offered a Limited Edition which included everything detailed above for the price of the DVDs alone – an amazing value. While some of these items are not presently available, we'll take a look at the entire package.

    First, a few introductory comments about the Erdnase book. Published in 1902, the volume has never been out of book, even though it is an admittedly difficult text. Dai Vernon was the most vocal admirer of the volume by the pseudonymous S.W. Erdnase, whose true identity has been the source of unending debate. Divided into sections on Card Table Artifice (a euphemism for 'cheating') and Legerdemain (or magic), the book is generally regarded as one of the first, and arguably the best, technical manuals on sleight-of-hand with cards.

    The problem is that the writing is dense and, written as it was more than a century ago, difficult for some to absorb. Vernon was a proselytiser for the excellence of the material contained within, and his annotations were published by Mike Caveney's MagicWords as Revelations (newly issued, now with photographs and further text as Revelation by Mike). Few magicians are adept enough at the material in the book to accurately perform and clearly teach what is contained in the book, and the choice of Allan Ackerman is perfect. Allan stresses that the videos are meant to provide an accompaniment to the book, and that reading it is necessary. He goes through each sleight meticulously, and the lovely accompanying booklet, in addition to providing an overview, cross-indexes each DVD chapter with a page number in the book. This is simply superb. Allan performs in a studio, alone for the Artifice section and with a spectator for the Legerdemain material, and three cameras are used, including an overhead view.

    The material begins with an introduction, meant to put the book into perspective. This is a fully staged playlet, produced with actors and narrated by the Academy Award-winning Ernest Borgnine. It's the story of the man many think was the real S.W. Erdnase, a hoodlum called Milton Franklin Andrews. We'll return to that name in a moment. This full-fledged production captures the mood and feel of turn-of-the-century gamblers in the western United States and is one of the finest magic-themed short films ever produced.

    The Ackerman material occupies six of the disks in the set. DVDs seven through ten contain a telephone interview with Martin Gardner and an interview with Bart Whaley and a presentation by Richard Hatch. Gardner and Whaley, along with Jeff Busby, wrote The Man Who Was Erdnase, a book which put forth the theory that M.F. Andrews was the real name of the author. This has been disputed and other theories have emerged from Richard Hatch and others. The eleventh disc, a CD-ROM, contains Adobe Acrobat versions of the Erdnase book, in the edition which includes comments from Prof. Hoffmann (also a pseudonym, for Angelo Lewis), historic newspaper clippings describing Andrews and the bloody death he met, information about the various editions of Expert which have been published, and two articles written by Gardner, and a previously published book detailing the letters between Gardner and the illustrator of the Erdnase book, Marshall Smith..

    As mentioned above, the Houdini company has issued some other books which will be briefly touched upon. The first of these is a small edition of the book itself. This is printed on very thin paper but everything is clear, including the many illustrations. It is a fine adjunct to the project; as Ackerman states, you definitely should read the book in addition to watching the DVDs.

    Next is Marlo on Erdnase by Jon Racherbaumer. This relates to Erdnase only peripherally in most instances, unless you consider anything about cards to relate to Erdnase (which it sort of does). The material is a compendium of Marlo writings and Racherbaumer emendations from a variety of sources, many of these the so-called 'Private Manuscripts' Marlo issued which are difficult to find. There is much of value here for, as I am fond of saying, the serious student of card magic. Although riddled with typos, everything is clear. One might think that the idea of this volume was to get Marlo's name somehow into the Vernon/Erdnase duality, but Marlo does deal spcifically with several Erdnase items, notably the tricks "The Exclusive Coterie"and "A Mind Reading Trick" and at the conclusion of the book we find Marlo's often acerbic "Comments on Vernon's Revelations. All in all, this book is worthwhile.

    I can no longer find on the Houdini website the following items, but I will at least tell you briefly about them. How Gamblers Win is a facsimile reproduction of a book on cheating by Gerritt M. Evans written in 1965 – that's more than 150 years ago. The book contains some interesting material from a historical perspective. It was reissued in an edited edition by the publishers Dick and Fitzgerald in 1868 authored by "A Retired Professional" and Bart Whaley says a copy of this bowdlerised edition is in The Magic Circle Library, but neither I nor executive Librarian Peter Lane were able to locate it.

    That Gerritt M. Evans ... that couldn't be a pseudonym, could it? Bart Whaley provides some research in a small volume titles The Mysterious Gambler and The Man Who Was Erdnase: Loose Ends and Dead Ends to pretty conclusively prove that it was, with the real author name being Edward M. Grandin and the story is an interesting one. Also included in this volume is a bit of updating of The Man Who Was Erdnase, including those bits and pieces he'd like to track down and suggestions for those who might want to embark on that hunting expedition.

    Because this review is of ten DVDs, a CD-ROM and four books it is much lengthier than what is usually included in this section of the magazine. But the project at hand is an enormous undertaking and, I believe, demands it.

    I'll sum up as best I can. The DVD set of The Expert at the Card Table is a brilliant undertaking which, I believe, helps make a most important book much more accessible to contemporary students. The production, the packaging and the care that has been taken reveal the esteem and respect which Geno Munari and Allan Ackerman have for Erdnase and, indeed, for magic itself. The $130 (£60.70) works out to $21 (£10) per disc if you consider just the six discs of Ackerman material. With fully five additional DVDs and the CD-Rom plus the accompanying booklet, this is an unbelievable bargain. Those who ordered early and received the additional material were fortunate. Certainly the Marlo book is worth considering if you are serious about card magic.

    My hat is off to Geno Munari and Allan Ackerman and the rest of the people who participated in this project. Bravo!

      Grade 
      28/10/2012

      Review from Genii Magazine

      Allan Ackerman is a card god. (Was that a little over the top? Okay, I'll tone it down.) Allan Ackerman is an extraordinarily skilled card manipulator and is one of just a few people on this planet who is qualified to expertly demonstrate the material in the book many simply refer to as "Erdnase."

      This project has been highly anticipated since its initial announcement. It took longer to produce than Geno Munari-whose Houdini Picture Corporation produced it-expected because he decided that he wanted to include historical information on the book and, of course, on the mystery of the book's author. With that, Mr. Munari had grabbed a tiger by the tail and delays were the result. The bottom line is that it was worth the wait and we-the consumers and magic's visual record-are the better for it.

      There are going to be the inevitable questions about a comparison between this project and the Wesley James edition released by Magic Makers soon after news of the Ackerman edition started circulating with earnest. I will address that briefly: There is absolutely no comparison. The Munari/Ackerman edition is far superior to the other on every level. And while the other is certainly less expensive, the value for the money doesn't even come close.

      The first disc-there are a total of 11 (10 DVDs and one CD)-opens with the question of who was the mysterious author of the most famous book on card manipulation extent. Narrated by award-winning actor Ernest Borgnine, a vignette-very well done by filmmaker Christie Wessling-focuses on Milton Franklin Andrews, the candidate endorsed by Martin Gardner, Bart Whaley, and others, and entertainingly tells the story of this shady character.

      Allan Ackerman's introduction follows where he states, "The goal of the DVD is to whet your appetite and get you to read the book." He also notes that he "sticks to the text" (he does) and does "not deviate too much from Erdnase's methodology" (for the most part he doesn't). He briefly discusses those changes he makes (primarily in the "Legerdemain" sections) and why.

      Throughout the six DVDs dedicated to the text, Ackerman indeed follows the flow of the book. If you need to know what is on these discs, consult the book's contents. What is important here is the quality of the instruction. From a production values standpoint, the camera work, sound, editing, and other aspects of the technicalities of DVD making are top drawer. The camera angles include face on (medium and tight), overhead, and over the shoulder from behind. As for the instruction, Ackerman is not only a skilled technician he is also an excellent teacher. His demonstrations are expertly done and he teaches the moves in a concise yet fairly thorough manner. He does spend more time on some pieces versus others. This, I believe, is a conscious decision based on which moves are still most relevant today and the technical difficulty of the various sleights. This is not to say that these descriptions are going to give the viewer complete insight into these manipulations. But, as noted by Mr. Ackerman, this is not the goal of these DVDs. However, these visuals will indeed give the student a leg up over book study alone.

      Dai Vernon often referred to ECT as his "bible." Bibles are often open to interpretation and this one is no different. There are moments in this project where Mr. Ackerman shares his interpretation of the text, and this is to be expected. But there are a couple of moments where his interpretation blurs the reality. At one point he says that Erdnase himself implies that the use of the right little finger in the first method of his Bottom Palm is "ugly." There is no such implication in the text that I can find, but Mr. Ackerman and I can indeed agree that the alternative method offered by Erdnase is superior. This is not the only time Mr. Ackerman takes such a liberty (and that's okay; it's his interpretation) and this is just another reason why the student must become familiar-if not intimate-with the original text.

      The "Legerdemain" section begins on disc number four. Ernest Borgnine reads from the introduction before Ackerman returns. This disc covers all the moves and I suspect it will become a favorite of the magician students out there. The fifth and sixth discs feature the tricks found in ECT. For the performances, Mr. Ackerman is joined by a series of female spectators. In those tricks where Erdnase included patter, Ackerman uses that patter, thus staying true to the text as promised. During the explanations, he occasionally makes very small changes to the technique and explains why he does so (it is always for reasons of construction and logic and not because he cannot do the effects as originally described).

      Disc six includes four tricks and one sleight not found in the book. Those "bonus" tricks-which all use principles found in ECT-are "Card Through Leg," "Elevator Aces" (Marlo), "Coterie" (another version of "The Exclusive Coterie"), and "Mind Reading." The sleight is Ackerman's variation of the Erdnase Bottom Palm (First Method). I would like to note that "Coterie" also uses the patter from the book. Here Ackerman points out that while the patter is in the public domain, Ricky Jay has, for more than three decades, made this one of his identifiable performance pieces and is so associated with him that we all should respect that and avoid using the patter in our own performances.

      Disc number seven has wonderful interviews with Martin Gardner (via telephone while photos and old film of Mr. Gardner play) and a filmed interview with Bart Whaley. They discuss with Geno Munari their favorite candidate for the true identity of Erdnase. The next three discs are dedicated to Richard Hatch where he first shares a fantastic publishing history of the book. He has with him for "show and tell" (his words) many of the various editions. Mr. Hatch then goes into his research on the elusive author and offers several candidates (and briefly mentions the research of David Alexander and Todd Karr), before finally settling on "his guy." And while his candidate has some very interesting possibilities, more compelling are his arguments why he believes Milton Franklin Andrews is not Erdnase. This is truly riveting stuff, and it's not the first time I've seen it! These discs are a must have for anyone interested in the mystery of Erdnase.

      The final disc is a CD-rom filled with a wealth of PDF files. There are 70 newspaper articles (mostly on M.F. Andrews), biographical information on Bart Whaley, a timeline of the publishing of the book, a timeline of the research done thus far, copies of the correspondence between Martin Gardner and M.D. Smith (the book's illustrator), an article penned by an Erdnase candidate, a short story by Gardner (with John Conrad) from 1958 that dramatizes the grisly end of M.F. Andrews, and a PDF copy (from the 1944 Powner edition) of ECT.

      This set of discs is a remarkable accomplishment and an absolute must-have for the card student and for historians as well. My only complaint is I would have liked to see the major subject titles listed on the discs. But this is remedied by the liner notes, a 24-page booklet printed on extra heavy card stock that will withstand a lifetime of referencing. It was printed when it was expected to be only a 10-disc set, so there is a misprint in that regard. But we all know that Disc 10 is Dick Hatch and the extras are on Disc 11. All this is held in a fantastic book-quality slipcase that will also standup to repeated usage. And I suspect that anyone who gets these discs will put them through repeated usage.

        Grade 
        28/10/2012

        Reviewed by Magic Circular

        Written by Matthew Field

        Houdini's Magic Shops are ten stores located in Las Vegas owned by Geno Munari.  Geno decided, after speaking with the well-known card expert Allan Ackerman, that he'd like to put out a set of DVDs to illustrate the moves described in the book.  The project took longer than expected to complete (eight years!) and prior to the DVDs release Geno offered a Limited Edition which included everything detailed above for the price of the DVDs alone – an amazing value.  While some of these items are not presently available, we'll take a look at the entire package.

         First, a few introductory comments about the Erdnase book.  Published in 1902, the volume has never been out of book, even though it is an admittedly difficult text.  Dai Vernon was the most vocal admirer of the volume by the pseudonymous S.W. Erdnase, whose true identity has been the source of unending debate.  Divided into sections on Card Table Artifice (a euphemism for 'cheating') and Legerdemain (or magic), the book is generally regarded as one of the first, and arguably the best, technical manuals on sleight-of-hand with cards.

        The problem is that the writing is dense and, written as it was more than a century ago, difficult for some to absorb.&nbsp; Vernon was a proselytiser for the excellence of the material contained within, and his annotations were published by Mike Caveney's MagicWords as <em>Revelations</em> (newly issued, now with photographs and further text as <em>Revelation</em> by Mike).&nbsp; Few magicians are adept enough at the material in the book to accurately perform and clearly teach what is contained in the book, and the choice of Allan Ackerman is perfect.&nbsp; Allan stresses that the videos are meant to provide an accompaniment to the book, and that reading it is necessary.&nbsp; He goes through each sleight meticulously, and the lovely accompanying booklet, in addition to providing an overview, cross-indexes each DVD chapter with a page number in the book.&nbsp; This is simply superb.&nbsp; Allan performs in a studio, alone for the Artifice section and with a spectator for the Legerdemain material, and three cameras are used, including an overhead view.

        The material begins with an introduction, meant to put the book into perspective.&nbsp; This is a fully staged playlet, produced with actors and narrated by the Academy Award-winning Ernest Borgnine.&nbsp; It's the story of the man many think was the real S.W. Erdnase, a hoodlum called Milton Franklin Andrews.&nbsp; We'll return to that name in a moment.&nbsp; This full-fledged production captures the mood and feel of turn-of-the-century gamblers in the western United States and is one of the finest magic-themed short films ever produced.

        The Ackerman material occupies six of the disks in the set.&nbsp; DVDs seven through ten contain a telephone interview with Martin Gardner and an interview with Bart Whaley and a presentation by Richard Hatch.&nbsp; Gardner and Whaley, along with Jeff Busby, wrote "The Man Who Was Erdnase", a book which put forth the theory that M.F. Andrews was the real name of the author.&nbsp; This has been disputed and other theories have emerged from Richard Hatch and others.&nbsp; The eleventh disc, a CD-ROM, contains Adobe Acrobat versions of the Erdnase book, in the edition which includes comments from Prof. Hoffmann (also a pseudonym, for Angelo Lewis), historic newspaper clippings describing Andrews and the bloody death he met, information about the various editions of <em>Expert</em> which have been published, and two articles written by Gardner, and a previously published book detailing the letters between Gardner and the illustrator of the Erdnase book, Marshall Smith..</p>
        <p>As mentioned above, the Houdini company has issued some other books which will be briefly touched upon. The first of these is a small edition of the book itself.&nbsp; This is printed on very thin paper but everything is clear, including the many illustrations.&nbsp; It is a fine adjunct to the project; as Ackerman states, you definitely should read the book in addition to watching the DVDs.


        Next is "Marlo on Erdnase" by Jon Racherbaumer. This relates to Erdnase only peripherally in most instances, unless you consider anything about cards to relate to Erdnase (which it sort of does).&nbsp; The material is a compendium of Marlo writings and Racherbaumer emendations from a variety of sources, many of these the so-called 'Private Manuscripts' Marlo issued which are difficult to find.&nbsp; There is much of value here for, as I am fond of saying, the serious student of card magic.&nbsp; Although riddled with typos, everything is clear.&nbsp; One might think that the idea of this volume was to get Marlo's name somehow into the Vernon/Erdnase duality, but Marlo does deal spcifically with several Erdnase items, notably the tricks &quot;The Exclusive Coterie&quot;and &quot;A Mind Reading Trick&quot; and at the conclusion of the book we find Marlo's often acerbic &quot;Comments on Vernon's <em>Revelations</em>.&nbsp; All in all, this book is worthwhile.

        I can no longer find on the Houdini website the following items, but I will at least tell you briefly about them. "How Gamblers Win" is a facsimile reproduction of a book on cheating by Gerritt M. Evans written in 1965 &ndash; that's more than 150 years ago.&nbsp; The book contains some interesting material from a historical perspective.&nbsp; It was reissued in an edited edition by the publishers Dick and Fitzgerald in 1868 authored by &quot;A&nbsp; Retired Professional&quot; and Bart Whaley says a copy of this bowdlerised edition is in The Magic Circle Library, but neither I nor executive Librarian Peter Lane were able to locate it.

        That Gerritt M. Evans ... that couldn't be a pseudonym, could it?&nbsp; Bart Whaley provides some research in a small volume titles <strong><em>The Mysterious Gambler and The Man Who Was Erdnase:&nbsp; Loose Ends and Dead Ends </em></strong>to pretty conclusively prove that it was, with the real author name being Edward M. Grandin and the story is an interesting one.&nbsp; Also included in this volume is a bit of updating of <em>The Man Who Was Erdnase</em>, including those bits and pieces he'd like to track down and suggestions for those who might want to embark on that hunting expedition.

        Because this review is of ten DVDs, a CD-ROM and four books it is much lengthier than what is usually included in this section of the magazine.&nbsp; But the project at hand is an enormous undertaking and, I believe, demands it.

        I'll sum up as best I can.&nbsp; The DVD set of <em>The Expert at the Card Table</em> is a brilliant undertaking which, I believe, helps make a most important book much more accessible to contemporary students.&nbsp; The production, the packaging and the care that has been taken reveal the esteem and respect which Geno Munari and Allan Ackerman have for Erdnase and, indeed, for magic itself.&nbsp; The $130 (&pound;60.70) works out to $21 (&pound;10) per disc <em>if you consider just the six discs of Ackerman material</em>.&nbsp; With fully five additional DVDs and the CD-Rom plus the accompanying booklet, this is an unbelievable bargain.&nbsp; Those who ordered early and received the additional material were fortunate.&nbsp; Certainly the Marlo book is worth considering if you are serious about card magic.

        My hat is off to Geno Munari and Allan Ackerman and the rest of the people who participated in this project.&nbsp; Bravo!

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